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The Aerospace Engineering Research Opportunity Scholars (AEROS) Program received a record number of applications this year. Sixteen students were selected to participate in the program, two times as many as last year. Established in 2013 as a way to expand the mission of the John Anderson Scholarship, the AEROS Program provides funding support for rising juniors and seniors to work on scholarly research projects.

The scholars conduct on-campus research with an aerospace faculty member in the summer, which helps prepare them for graduate school. The department supports them by providing research funding, holding a graduate school workshop, and hosting a presentation day where scholars present their work to members of the aero community.

Students with a minimum 3.5 cumulative grade point average beginning their junior or senior year in the upcoming fall semester are encouraged to apply. They must be able to work full-time over the summer on the research project, which allows them to earn $3,000 for their work.

To read about this year’s AEROS scholars, visit https://aero.umd.edu/aeros-scholars. For more information about the AEROS Program, visit https://aero.umd.edu/aeros-program.



July 30, 2018


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