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The Clark School's Morpheus Lab, based at the National Institute of Aerospace, has donated an ornithopter (flapping-wing vehicle) sculpture developed by Clark School students and researchers to the Smithsonian American History Museum Spark! Lab in Washington, D.C.

"The Morpheus Lab Team welcomes the opportunity to help create the dreams of tomorrow's aerospace engineers," said Morpheus Director James Hubbard.

Earlier this month, students from the Morpheus Lab took part in a robotic exhibition at Spark! Lab to illustrate current and future technologies. The students demonstrated their ornithopter systems, engaging with museum patrons of all ages. Representing the Morpheus Lab were graduate researchers Cornelia Altenbuchner, Alex Brown, Jared Grauer, and Aimy Wissa, as well as undergraduate researcher Eric Avadikian.

View a video online of the team at Spark! Lab.



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April 28, 2011


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