search

UMD    CORE




The University of Maryland team took third place in the first NASA Robo-Ops design competition. Seven schools built robots capable of traversing the "Rock Yard" at the Johnson Space Center and collecting samples (colored rocks). Each robot had to be controlled remotely from the home university. RH-EA1 (Remote Harvester - Earth Analog) did very well on the course, collecting three samples in the allotted time.

The University of Maryland did very well throughout the competition. Chris Carlsen and Steven Friedman did incredible work as the "away team", including replacing a broken linkage in the manipulator end effector with only 30 minutes to go to the start time to allow the robot to be fully functional on the course. The rest of the team in the Kim building did one a great job controlling the vehicle remotely, despite being challenged by insufficient communications bandwidth and camera resolution. Great thanks are also due to the grad students of the Space Systems Lab, who hosted the fabrication process and the ground control station, and provided useful advice throughout the process. The team has plans to participate again next year.

Related Articles:
NASA Robo-Ops Final Standings
Three Ph.D. students awarded Amazon Lab126 Fellowships
Hartzell Mission Scientist for NASA SIMPLEx Janus Mission
NASA’s ASRS an Effective Tool for Improving Unmanned Aviation Safety
Rachel Suitor aboard NGS/NOAA expedition in Gulf of Mexico
Two UMD Teams Take Best in Theme at NASA’s RASC-AL Competition
Xu, Castano Recognized for Work on UAS Collision Avoidance
UMD Takes Second in VFS Design-Build-Vertical-Flight Competition
UMD, UMBC, ARL Announce Cooperative Agreement to Accelerate AI, Autonomy in Complex Environments
Completing a Doctorate—Aboard an Aircraft Carrier

May 27, 2011


«Previous Story  

 

 

Current Headlines

Brent Sherwood (M.S. ‘88) to Establish Space Architecture Endowed Undergraduate Research Award in Engineering

Space, Wide Open

Service and Grit

Richeson Family Establishes Glen W. Richeson, Jr. Maryland Promise Scholarship

Rosemary Parker Honored with President's Distinguished Service Award

UMD’s Tunnel-Boring Engineers Showcase Skills, Perseverance

Three Ph.D. students awarded Amazon Lab126 Fellowships

Welcome, Samuel Graham, Jr., Dean of Maryland Engineering

Hartzell Mission Scientist for NASA SIMPLEx Janus Mission

NASA’s ASRS an Effective Tool for Improving Unmanned Aviation Safety

 
 
Back to top  
CORE Home Clark School Home UMD Home Aerospace Engineering